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Women of their Ilk

It is the women who often end up choosing the sacrificing side, highlights Bakul Banerjee through a poem.

Niloufer’s Birthday

A family comes together to remember, in different ways, a woman whose presence is still strong in their lives, each for a different reason. Parth Pandya tells the story.

Spark – March 2014 Issue

We are happy to share the March 2014 issue of Spark with the theme, ‘She’. This issue has been put together keeping in mind the International Women’s Day and focuses on various thoughts that comes to one’s mind when we think of the word ‘She’. There’s fiction, non-fiction, poetry and art that bring together interesting perspectives. Click here to access the issue on the e-reader, ISSUU.

Solitude

Solitude could be a terrifying experience, a pain to live with especially when one’s life partner isn’t around physically. It’s also the time when one realises that certain things in life lack meaning when that togetherness vanishes. Ram Govardhan writes a touching story about a woman and a man.

Her Smile

A woman’s mesmerizing smile is the essence of this lovely little poem by M. Mohankumar. Read on.

Woman of the House

The expectations off the woman of a house are many, the foremost being obedience without questioning. Shirani Rajapakse captures this in a poem.

Mother

She is Earth, She is Nature, She is a Tree, She is a Mother. Stop slaughtering her in all forms, stresses Prajna Tejaswi through her pencil and charcoal artwork.

Being Out

Mumbai showed her a whole new side to being out late in the night, says Vani Viswanathan, in this account of rediscovery.

Black

Black is a colour that signifies enigma, attraction and power. However, the Indian mindset is such that it doesn’t favour dark skin tone in women, says Sarita Jenamani through her poem.

Mrs. Commissioner

A Commissioner is very formidable when it comes to dealing with men at work but she faces a very different scene back home. Sudha Nair tells the story of this powerful yet sensitive woman.

Angels and Demons

Vinita Agrawal’s poem throws light on one of the ugliest social ills of India – female foeticide.