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The Mirage of Choice

by Parth Pandya

Choice is confining. Dreaming is limitless. And yet we are bound to what we manage by the choices we make. Parth Pandya’s poem explores how choice can be a curse more often than we like.

She wishes life was arranged like
The chiaroscuro of a cobbled street
The darkness allowed to coexist
With the light within her that
Waxed and waned like the
Trenchant moon outside her window

She wishes she was a tree
Whose roots she could hide
While they spread unbeknownst
To the world that pried and stared
And willed her to melt down
Like a cube of ice under the hot sun

She wishes that she could dream
Without the practical considerations
That shackled the flight that dreams
Should be allowed to take
Not weighed down by the drag of reason
Not burnt like the wings of Icarus

She wishes that she could choose
The life that she wished for
That she would point to a closed fist
And would always find a coin within it
That every choice was a deliberate move
Always made to move her forward

She wishes that true choice was not a myth
That she could choose the wishes
That would inevitably turn to reality
That her outcomes were not
The dispassionate verdicts of probability
And her choices were not curses in hiding

Parth Pandya moonlights as a writer even as he spends his day creating software and evenings raising his two sons to be articulate, model citizens who like Tendulkar and Mohammad Rafi. He has been regularly published in forums such as Spark, OneFortyFiction and Every Day Poets. Taking his passion a step further, he wrote his first book ‘r2i dreams’, a tale of Indian immigrants as they work through the quintessential dilemma, ‘for here or to go?’ You can know more about the book at https://www.facebook.com/r2idreams
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